Sound 27x40.jpg

"Sound is Half the Picture" connects a human face to the hidden art of sound design and music
for independent film. Through a humorous character study of Philadelphia-based composer John Avarese, this doc short explores the invisible techniques and central value of film sound-- preserving its distinct residence within the filmmaking process. 

*WINNER* Best Documentary Dublin International Short Film and Music Festival - October 2017
*Official Selection* New York Short Film Festival - November 2017
*Official Selection* International Short Film Festival Beveren, Belgium - December 2017
*Official Selection* Berlin Independent Film Festival, Germany - February 2018
*Official Selection* Short. Sweet. Film Fest, Cleveland, Ohio - March 2018
*Official Selection* Bare Bones International Film & Music Festival, Muskogee, OK, April 2018
*Official Selection* West Chester International Film Festival, West Chester, PA, April 2018
*Official Selection* Asbury Park Music & Film Festival, Asbury Park, NJ, April 2018
"Sound is Half the Picture" connects a human face to the hidden art of sound design and music
for independent film. Through a humorous character study of Philadelphia-based composer John Avarese, this doc short explores the invisible techniques and central value of film sound-- preserving its distinct residence within the filmmaking process. 


Post Sound Design

Post Sound Design provides a practical introduction to the fascinating craft of editing and replacing dialog, creating Foley and sound effects, editing music, and balancing these elements to a final mix. Based on years of experience and teaching this material to students at Drexel University, award-winning film composer John Avarese offers user-friendly knowledge and stimulating exercises to help compose story, develop characters and create emotion through skillful creation of the sound track. Starting each chapter with a real-life example, the textbook is structured in such a way to create a fundamental understanding of the physics and the biological foundation of hearing, and putting it into practice with suggested movie scenes demonstrating the discussed audio techniques. Post Sound Design engagingly demonstrates the individual areas essential to creating a soundtrack that will enhance any media production.

 

PRESS

 

Composer John Avarese creates a fittingly haunting environment that evocatively sets the stage for a finale (or is it actually a prologue?) that transpires on the certifiably creepy grounds of a derelict Philadelphia psychiatric hospital.

The Hollywood Reporter  February 17, 2007  The 4th Dimension

Following the 1980s theme is the music. My ears were flipping out listening to the score of the film and all its exciting synth-sounding goodness. It’s cool as hell. IN fact, as good as the film is as a whole, the music was my favorite part. Bravo to composer John Avarese. You knocked it out of the park with this one.

MobidlyBeautiful.com   Jason McFiggins  June 4, 2017

John Avarese’s agreeable light-jazz score, which occasionally dips into a classical mode, lends the film a jaunty buoyancy.

The New York Times August 31, 2010

John Avarese's music and sound design provide a match for the images that's never less than ideal.

Variety Sept. 22, 2009

“Even more omnipresent than human voices are John Avarese’s musical accompaniments----or should I call them commentaries?---in a delightful array of styles. He explains in “Making Tulip” that “Initially, the concept of the film would be string quartet---let’s keep this very European-sounding and classical.” But as the film developed, so did it’s improvisatory music. Some of the classical or chamber music elements are still present, but piano jazz interventions are frequent, as are march rhythms with oompah instruments, brief choral or organ interludes, and ¾ time song melodies, plus a stride piano theme inspired by Fats Waller. In this lighthearted, wide-open musical atmosphere I was pleased to hear a reference to “Se vuol ballare” from The Marriage of Figaro. The moment comes when Ackerley takes Tulip to the country for a visit with his old army friend, Captain Pugh. The expectations of bucolic pleasure are ruined by Tulip’s disastrous middle-of-the-night defecation for the occasion. But when I asked Avarese about it, he said the only intention allusion was to the realm of the Renaissance lute---the pavans and galliards of John Dowland. Sure enough, Mozart dissolves into Dowland after a few bars, and the bucolic theme (lutes, shepherds, fair maidens) fits better than Figaro. But I defy anyone who knows the opera not to hear it first as Mozart played on the harpsichord. Either way it’s exquisitely sardonic comedy."

The Hudson Review Excerpt from “The Beastliness on My Dog Tulip” by Dean Flower Volume LXV   Number 1   Spring 2012

Post Sound Design square.png